Sunday, December 10, 2017

Advent: I Have Not Forgotten You - Homily for December 10



St. John in the Wilderness by Jose Leonardo
Readings for Sunday, December 10 / 2nd Sunday of Advent: Isaiah 40:1-5, 9-11  |  Psalm 85  |  2 Peter 3:8-14  |  Mark 1:1-8 

While this season is the 'most wonderful time of the year' it is also a time when we experience in various ways the ache of the human heart. To that ache the Lord comes to comfort us and reassure us 'I have not forgotten you.'

Monday, December 4, 2017

Advent: The Useless Things - Homily for December 3



Readings for Sunday, December 3 / 1st Sunday of Advent: Isaiah 63:16-17, 19; 64:2-7  |  Psalm 80  |  1 Corinthians 1:3-9  |  Mark 13:33-37

The human heart desires to see grand things. "Rend the heavens and come down!" we cry out to God, and yet it is in the little things, sometimes the useless things, that God speaks most clearly. May we be awake and alert to the quiet voice of God this Advent season. 

Monday, November 27, 2017

Papal Intention for December 2017

Pope Francis invites us to join in prayer for the elderly during this month of December:

That the elderly, sustained by families and Christian communities, may apply their wisdom and experience to spreading the faith and forming the new generations.

While we're at it....

V. Let us pray for Francis, our Pope.
R. May the Lord preserve him, give him life,
and make him blessed upon the earth,
and deliver him not up to the will of his enemies.

Our Father... Hail Mary...

O God, Shepherd and Ruler of all Thy faithful people, look mercifully upon Thy servant Francis, whom Thou hast chosen as shepherd to preside over Thy Church. Grant him, we beseech Thee, that by his word and example, he may edify those over whom he hath charge, so that together with the flock committed to him, may he attain everlasting life. Through Christ our Lord. Amen.

Monday, November 13, 2017

The Importance of Oil - Homily for November 12


Readings for Sunday, November 12 / 32nd Sunday of Ordinary Time: Wisdom 6:12-16  |  Psalm 63  | 1 Thessalonians 4:13-18  |  Matthew 25:1-13

The Lord clearly reminds us this weekend that we must have oil to be prepared for His coming and the oil is the life of faith and the celebration of the Sacraments. Don't be caught off guard without a full tank!

Monday, November 6, 2017

The Priest - Homily for November 5



Readings for Sunday, November 5 / 31st Sunday of Ordinary Time: Malachi 1:14-2:2, 8-10  |  Psalm 131  |  1 Thessalonians 2:7-9, 13  |  Matthew 23:1-12

The priest exercises an office of great dignity, but if he forgets the dignity is not his own he is the greatest of fools. Let us pray for our priests to recognize the dignity of their vocation and exercise humility in carrying it out. Let us pray, too, for more young men to respond to this great call to give one's life for the good of the Church.

Tuesday, October 31, 2017

Indulgences and the Faithful Departed

All Saints Day and All Souls Day are upon us and it is good to think about the many graces that are available for those who have gone before us and are undergoing their spiritual purification in purgatory. They may be our loved ones, members of our community, or souls we don't know from all places of the world and history. To pray for them is to help them in their journey to Heaven. And once they attain their heavenly reward, they'll be praying for us before the Throne of God! So let us take up this great act of charity for souls in helping them along their way.

A plenary indulgence, applicable only to the souls in purgatory, is granted to the faithful who fulfill the following conditions:
     • Visit a Church on November 2, All Souls' Day
     • Offer an Our Father and Hail Mary for the Pope's Intentions
     • Offer an Our Father and the Creed for the Faithful Departed
     • Make a good confession within a week and be free from all attachment to sin
     • Receive Holy Communion that day (or ASAP following if unable that day)

A plenary indulgence, applicable only to the souls in purgatory, is also granted to the faithful who fulfill the following conditions:
     • on any and each day from November 1 to 8, devoutly visit a cemetery and pray, if only mentally,                               for the departed (the 'Eternal rest grant unto them...' suffices)
     • Offer an Our Father and Hail Mary for the Pope's Intentions
     • Make a good confession within a week and be free from all attachment to sin
     • Receive Holy Communion that day (or ASAP following if unable that day)

Monday, October 30, 2017

Papal Intentions for November 2017

Papal Intention for November 2017: 
Christians in Asia. 

That Christians in Asia, bearing witness to the Gospel in word and deed, may promote dialogue, peace, and mutual understanding, especially with those of other religions.

Prayer for the Pope

V. Let us pray for Francis, our Pope.
R. May the Lord preserve him, give him life, 
and make him blessed upon the earth, 
and deliver him not up to the will of his enemies.

Our Father... Hail Mary...

O God, Shepherd and Ruler of all Thy faithful people, look mercifully upon Thy servant Francis, whom Thou hast chosen as shepherd to preside over Thy Church. Grant him, we beseech Thee, that by his word and example, he may edify those over whom he hath charge, so that together with the flock committed to him, may he attain everlasting life. Through Christ our Lord. Amen.

Sunday, October 29, 2017

The Greatest Commandment - Homily for October 29



Chapel of St. Claude la Colombiere
Readings for Sunday, October 29 / 30th Sunday of Ordinary Time: Exodus 22:20-26  |  Psalm 18  |  1 Thessalonians 1:5-10  |  Matthew 22:34-40

The Lord reminds us that the great commandment is to love the Lord with all of our heart, all of our mind, and all of our soul. When it happens, beautiful things happen. The lives of the saints show us what it looks like.

Sunday, October 8, 2017

Holy Mass: Receiving Christ - Homily for October 8


Readings for Sunday, October 8 / 27th Sunday of Ordinary Time: Isaiah 5:1-7  |  Psalm 80  |  Philippians 4:6-9  |  Matthew 21:33-43

Our Gospel today tells us of the consequences of not receiving Christ as we ought. Let us give some reflection to the manner of receiving Holy Communion at Mass, both the exterior and the interior, that Our Lord might find in us a welcoming soul to His Presence.

Monday, October 2, 2017

Holy Mass: Humility - Homily for October 1






The 'Christ Hymn' recounted by St. Paul today shows us the humility of Christ and provides a model and encouragement for us to do the same. The prayers of the Mass leading up to Holy Communion are a great aid to us in this.

Sunday, September 24, 2017

Monday, September 18, 2017

Holy Mass: The Canon - Homily for September 17


Readings for Sunday, September 17 / 24th Sunday of Ordinary Time: Sirach 27:30-28:7  |  Psalm 103 |  Romans 14:7-9  |  Matthew 18:21-35

The Eucharistic Prayer is the core of the Mass, when the consecration of the gifts takes places and they are offered to the Father for our salvation. This week we reflect upon that mystery and why I use the Roman Canon almost exclusively on Sundays. 

Sunday, September 10, 2017

Holy Mass: It is Right and Just - Homily for September 10



Readings for Sunday, September 10 / 23rd Sunday of Ordinary Time: Ezekiel 33:7-9  |  Psalm 95  |  Romans 13:8-10  |  Matthew 18:15-20

This week the Lord reminds us that gathering to pray in community is powerful. We are not Christians who content ourselves with a 'Me & Jesus' approach to the faith. Rather, we are members of the Body of Christ and when we gather together the Lord fills us with His grace and then sends us out to do the same for others. 

Sunday, September 3, 2017

Holy Mass: The Offertory - Homily for September 3



Readings for Sunday, September 3rd / 22nd Sunday of Ordinary Time: Jeremiah 20:7-9  |  Psalm 63  |  Romans 12:1-2  |  Matthew 16:21-27

During the Offertory we are called to offer much more than money, bread, and wine. We are called to offer entire selves to become a living sacrifice that can be used in the hands of Our Blessed Lord. May God grant us the grace deny ourselves and follow Him. 

Friday, September 1, 2017

Papal Intentions for September

For Church Parishes: That our parishes, animated by a missionary spirit, may be places where faith is communicated and charity is seen.

Our Father...
Hail Mary...
Glory Be...

Prayer for the Pope

V. Let us pray for Francis, our Pope.
R. May the Lord preserve him, give him life, 
and make him blessed upon the earth, 
and deliver him not up to the will of his enemies.
Our Father... Hail Mary...
O God, Shepherd and Ruler of all Thy faithful people, look mercifully upon Thy servant Francis, whom Thou hast chosen as shepherd to preside over Thy Church. Grant him, we beseech Thee, that by his word and example, he may edify those over whom he hath charge, so that together with the flock committed to him, may he attain everlasting life. Through Christ our Lord. Amen.

Monday, August 28, 2017

Holy Mass: The Readings - Homily for August 27


Readings for Sunday, August 27 / 21st Sunday of Ordinary Time: Isaiah 22:19-23  |  Psalm 138  |  Romans 11:33-36  |  Matthew 16:13-20

Each week we hear the readings proclaimed and it can be easy to zone out or be distracted by many other things going on in our minds. The readings, however, are not to be missed because they are the voice of God speaking to us. When we pray we long to hear a response - in the Scriptures we find it. Let us pray for open hearts and open ears, that when the Lord speaks we can hear and respond. 

Sunday, August 20, 2017

Mass: The Entrance - Homily for August 20



Readings for Sunday, August 20 / 20th Sunday of Ordinary Time: Isaiah 56:1, 6-7  |  Psalm 67  |  Romans 11:13-15, 29-32  |  Matthew 15:21-28

The Holy Mass is the place where the "house of prayer for all peoples" comes to life right in our midst. The house of God is here for us to come to worship. Every word and action has a meaning. As we begin this series of reflections on the Mass, we discuss the movement from the Entrance Procession up to the Gloria. May the Lord grant us the grace always to continue to draw close to Him as we do each week in the Liturgy.

Monday, August 14, 2017

Hiding in His Heart - Homily for August 13



Readings for Sunday, August 13 / 19th Sunday of OT: 1 Kings 19:9,11-13  |  Psalm 85  |  Romans 9:1-5  |  Matthew 14:22-33

The Lord invites us today to fly to him and to rest in His Sacred Heart much like Elijah hid in the cave of the mountain. May we have the strength to turn to Him in our need and to remain with Him so as to hear His voice in the silence. 

Sunday, July 30, 2017

We Found the Pearl - Homily for July 30



Readings for Sunday, July 30 / 17th Sunday of Ordinary Time: 1 Kings 3:5, 7-12  |  Psalm 119  |  Romans 8:28-30  |  Matthew 13:44-52

The pearl of great price and the hidden treasure, both of which we ought to be willing to sell all to
obtain, is the Catholic Church. Why? Because the Church is Christ Himself - we are the Body of Christ, she gives us the Words of Christ in the Scripture, she gives us the teaching of Christ, and we even receive the Body of Christ to truly make us united to His Body in flesh and blood. What a gift! And what sadness to go without it. 

Monday, July 24, 2017

Presumption in the Kingdom - Homily for July 23



Readings for Sunday, July 23 / 16th Sunday of Ordinary Time: Wisdom 12:13, 16-19  |  Psalm 86  |  Romans 8:26-27  |  Matthew 13:24-43

The Kingdom of Heaven, the Church, is a living organism that quietly changes the world. Unfortunately, sometime we make presumptions about other members of the Church, or even ourselves. Today the Lord reminds us not to make presumptions, leaving the final judgment to Him alone. 

Monday, July 17, 2017

Seeds and Hope - Homily for July 16



Readings for Sunday, July 16 / 15th Sunday of Ordinary Time:  Isaiah 55:10-11  |  Psalm 65  |  

Romans 8:18-23  |  Matthew 13:1-23

Trying to live the Christian life can be difficult when we don't see fruits from our labors, whether in our own soul or in the world around us. Today the Lord encourages us not to lose hope. 

Monday, July 3, 2017

Gifts for your Priest - Homily for July 2


Readings for Sunday, July 2 / 13th Sunday of Ordinary Time: 2 Kings 4:8-11, 14-16  |  Psalm 89  |  Romans 6:3-4, 8-11  |  Matthew 10:37-42

Generosity shown to a prophet, righteous man, or disciple is repaid by the Lord. Today a great person
to give a gift to is a priest. Check out my top 10 (in no particular order) list of great gifts for your priest.

Saturday, July 1, 2017

Papal Intention for July 2017


Papal Intention for July 2017

Pope's Prayer Intention - That our brothers and sisters who have strayed from the faith, through our prayer and witness to the Gospel, may rediscover the merciful closeness of the Lord and the beauty of the Christian life.

Prayer for the Pope

V. Let us pray for Francis, our Pope.
R. May the Lord preserve him, give him life, 
and make him blessed upon the earth, 
and deliver him not up to the will of his enemies.

Our Father... Hail Mary...

O God, Shepherd and Ruler of all Thy faithful people, look mercifully upon Thy servant Francis, whom Thou hast chosen as shepherd to preside over Thy Church. Grant him, we beseech Thee, that by his word and example, he may edify those over whom he hath charge, so that together with the flock committed to him, may he attain everlasting life. Through Christ our Lord. Amen.


Sunday, June 25, 2017

The Lord Is With Me - Homily for June 25



Vesting Bishop Provost in preparation for Holy Mass
Readings for Sunday, June 25 / 12th Sunday of Ordinary Time: Jeremiah 20:10-13  |  Psalm 69  |  Romans 5:12-15  |  Matthew 10:26-33

This weekend the Scriptures call to mind the many things which we fear and wrestle with through our week - the attacks from others, the attack from sin, and the attacks of the evil one. In all of this, we need not fear because the Lord is with us. United to Him, He fights for us.

Sunday, June 18, 2017

Corpus Christi: No Mere Symbol - Homily for June 18

Miraculous Host & Blood at Lanciano


The Holy Eucharist is no mere sign or symbol, but is a the true Body, Blood, Soul, and Divinity of Jesus Christ. As Catholics, we must approach this mystery with great attention, reverence, awe, and love. May the Eucharistic Heart of Jesus increase these virtues in us until the day He calls us home!

Monday, June 12, 2017

Trinity Sunday - Homily for June 11



Readings for Sunday, June 11 / Trinity Sunday: Exodus 34:4-6, 8-9  |  Deuteronomy 3  |  2 Corinthians 13:11-13  |  John 3:16-18

The feast of the Most Holy Trinity celebrates the central mystery of the Christian faith - that we worship one God who is three persons: Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. Let us seek to know Him better that we might love Him more.

Monday, June 5, 2017

Pentecost: Where's the fruit? - Homily for June 4



Readings for Sunday, June 4 / Pentecost: Acts 2:1-11  |  Psalm 104  |  1 Corinthians 12:3-7, 12-13  |  John 20:19-23

The Holy Spirit dwells in our soul and in doing so enlivens that which is good and holy and seeks to destroy that which is not godly. A way of seeing if this is truly taking place in the soul is to see what fruits we produce, particularly the 12 Fruits of the Holy Spirit. So ... where's the fruit?

Friday, June 2, 2017

Papal Intentions for June 2017

Papal Intention for June 2017

Pope's Prayer Intention - That national leaders may firmly commit themselves to ending the arms trade, which victimizes so many innocent people.

Prayer for the Pope

V. Let us pray for Francis, our Pope.
R. May the Lord preserve him, give him life, 
and make him blessed upon the earth, 
and deliver him not up to the will of his enemies.

Our Father... Hail Mary...

O God, Shepherd and Ruler of all Thy faithful people, look mercifully upon Thy servant Francis, whom Thou hast chosen as shepherd to preside over Thy Church. Grant him, we beseech Thee, that by his word and example, he may edify those over whom he hath charge, so that together with the flock committed to him, may he attain everlasting life. Through Christ our Lord. Amen.


Monday, May 29, 2017

Ascension: Divine Spitballs and the Church - Homily for May 28



Readings for Sunday, May 28 / Ascension of the Lord: Acts 1:1-11  |  Psalm 47  |  Ephesians 1:17-23  |  Matthew 28:16-20

The Ascension of the Lord is not a time when Christ leaves the Church, rather it is a time when He takes full authority and is able to grant grace and power on a large scale to the Church. May we be docile instruments in the hand of so great a King!


Monday, May 22, 2017

Easter: If you love Me... - Homily for May 21



Readings for Sunday, May 21 / 6th Sunday of Easter: Acts 8:5-8, 14-17  |  Psalm 66  |  1 Peter 3:15-18  |  John 14:15-21

The Lord tells us today, "If you love Me, you will keep My Commandments." The keeping of the Commandments of God is, then, not so much a matter of checking boxes off as it is a measure of our love for the Lord Himself. Lord Jesus, we love You. Help us to love You more!

Monday, May 15, 2017

Easter: Pray for Peace - Homily for May 14



Readings for Sunday, May 14: Acts 6:1-7  |  Psalm 33  |  1 Peter 2:4-9  |  John 14:1-12

This weekend is the centennial anniversary of the first apparition of Our Lady of Fatima to the shepherd children. As Pope St. John Paul II and Pope Benedict XVI reminded us, the message of Fatima is even more important today than in years past. Let us heed the call to pray the rosary daily for peace and to make sacrifices for the conversion of hearts!

Sunday, May 7, 2017

Easter: United to the Shepherd - Homily for May 7



Readings for Sunday, May 7 / 4th Sunday of Easter: Acts 2:14, 36-41  |  Psalm 23  |  1 Peter 2:20-25  |  John 10:1-10

The Good Shepherd calls us to follow after Him, but it is not enough simply to follow behind Him. We must be united to Him. The Church provides many paths to this union, but three hold particular importance: the Eucharist, the Scriptures, and daily prayer. Draw close to Him and He will draw close to you. 

Monday, May 1, 2017

Papal Intentions for May 2017

Papal Intention for May 2017

Pope's Prayer Intention - Christians in Africa: That Christians in Africa, in imitation of the Merciful Jesus, may give prophetic witness to reconciliation, justice, and peace.



Urgent Intention - Landslide Victims: Victims of the landslide in Colombia and peace in the Democratic Republic of Congo, Venezuela, and Paraguay.

Prayer for the Pope

V. Let us pray for Francis, our Pope.
R. May the Lord preserve him, give him life, 
and make him blessed upon the earth, 
and deliver him not up to the will of his enemies.
Our Father... Hail Mary...
O God, Shepherd and Ruler of all Thy faithful people, look mercifully upon Thy servant Francis, whom Thou hast chosen as shepherd to preside over Thy Church. Grant him, we beseech Thee, that by his word and example, he may edify those over whom he hath charge, so that together with the flock committed to him, may he attain everlasting life. 
Through Christ our Lord. 
Amen.


Monday, April 24, 2017

Easter: The Limits of Mercy - Homily for April 23



Readings for Sunday, April 23 / Divine Mercy Sunday: Acts 2:42-47  |  Psalm 118  |  1 Peter 1:3-9  |  John 20:19-31

This weekend we celebrate Divine Mercy Sunday. The readings tell us how the Early Church shared all things in common, giving without limits in the service of the larger community. Do we believe in mercy without limits? Even more importantly, are we willing to BE merciful without limits?

The full statement of the Louisiana Conference of Catholic Bishops on the Death Penalty can be found here.

Monday, April 3, 2017

Papal Intentions for April 2017

Papal Intention for April 2017

Pope's Prayer Intention - Young People: That young people may respond generously to their vocations and seriously consider offering themselves to God in the priesthood or consecrated life.

Urgent Intention - Landslide Victims: Victims of the landslide in Colombia and peace in the Democratic Republic of Congo, Venezuela, and Paraguay.

Prayer for the Pope

V. Let us pray for Francis, our Pope.
R. May the Lord preserve him, give him life, 
and make him blessed upon the earth, 
and deliver him not up to the will of his enemies.
Our Father... Hail Mary...
O God, Shepherd and Ruler of all Thy faithful people, look mercifully upon Thy servant Francis, whom Thou hast chosen as shepherd to preside over Thy Church. Grant him, we beseech Thee, that by his word and example, he may edify those over whom he hath charge, so that together with the flock committed to him, may he attain everlasting life. 
Through Christ our Lord. 
Amen.

Lent: How to go to Confession - Homily for April 2



Readings for Sunday, April 2 / 5th Sunday of Lent: Ezekiel 37:12-14  |  Psalm 130  |  Romans 8:8-11  |  John 11:1-45

Sometimes it's the lack of comfort with the words and structure of Confession that the devil uses to keep us away from the Sacrament. So let's hit the nuts and bolts on how to celebrate the Sacrament. Then put it into practice.

Sunday, March 26, 2017

Sunday, March 12, 2017

Lent: The Plan - Homily for March 12



Readings for Sunday, March 12 / 2nd Sunday of Lent: Genesis 12:1-4  |  Psalm 33  |  2 Timothy 1:8-10  |  Matthew 17:1-9

God has a plan for you today. It involves your holiness and some hardship. Bear your share of the hardship in the Gospel and spread the joy of knowing Jesus Christ to all whom you meet.

Sunday, March 5, 2017

Lent: The Grappin - Homily for March 5



Beginning this weekend, I will be posting my Sunday homilies in audio-only format on account of the extra time it takes to type, format, and post the text version. I apologize if this causes some inconvenience for you, but I trust you understand. I will continue to post the audio portion here along with links to the readings as normal. Thank you, as always, and know of my prayers for each of you. Please pray for me too.

Wednesday, March 1, 2017

Papal Intentions for March 2017

Papal Intention for March 2017

That persecuted Christians may be supported by the prayers and material help of the whole Church.

Prayer for the Pope

V. Let us pray for Francis, our Pope.
R. May the Lord preserve him, give him life, 
and make him blessed upon the earth, 
and deliver him not up to the will of his enemies.

Our Father... Hail Mary...

O God, Shepherd and Ruler of all Thy faithful people, look mercifully upon Thy servant Francis, whom Thou hast chosen as shepherd to preside over Thy Church. Grant him, we beseech Thee, that by his word and example, he may edify those over whom he hath charge, so that together with the flock committed to him, may he attain everlasting life. Through Christ our Lord. Amen.

Tuesday, February 28, 2017

Pre-Lent: Almsgiving - Homily for February 26



Readings for Sunday, February 26 / 8th Sunday of Ordinary Time: Isaiah 49:14-15  |  Psalm 62  |  1 Corinthians 4:1-5  |  Matthew 6:24-34

Ash Wednesday, just a few days away, we come to the end of the Lenten homily series, the pre-Lent. And so we have reflected in recent weeks on the aspect of fasting, reflected on prayer, and today we come to that invitation the Lord God gives to us of alms-giving, to continue to correct our hearts to show to show generosity, but even more so to instill within us trust in our God. 

At the college seminary, things were pretty easy as far as a life of discernment and prayer, relatively speaking, it wasn't too stressful because priesthood was still somewhere else, it was still far in the distance, it was a good at-least four years away at most. And so there was not a lot of pressure, but when I moved to the theology seminary in New Orleans, there was a whole different ball game. You would walk out the door and the guy next to you is already wearing a Roman collar and you referred to him as deacon. It is a different reality as it puts a whole lot more stress on the actual discernment of one's possible vocation to the priesthood. There was a lot more focus on the life of prayer and trying to trust in the Lord that He would in fact give me everything that I needed. And one of the things that helped me more times than I can even count was the statue of Our Lady over the entry way of the seminary itself. As you came in the front door through the parking lot, there was a statue of Our Lady, and at her feet a simple phrase, two words, "Deus Providebit", "God will provide." And over and over again as I walked into the seminary so many times, to look up and read those words, it was a consolation to me "God will provide." It was a reminder that my God loves me and if I actually believe the things that are said about Him, I ought to trust that He will provide for my needs, and not to be consumed with worrying about so many things, but rather simply to trust and do my best each day to follow after Him. Deus Providebit, God will provide." 

It's that sense that the Lord invites us to give alms. Really ultimately to trust in Him, that He will provide for us. Alms-giving comes in a variety of ways, but ultimately it's a recognition that it's something given to us that we are called to give to others. In our seminary course, we had a course on the spiritual life, and there was one reality that they described, the way of God's grace that comes to us, that has continued to resonate within my heart. And it's something that comes in very practical days through the course of the days, and grace was described in two separate ways. The Latin phrasing for one, gratia gratum faciens, which is grace that makes one graced, so it is grace that does something in the individual. And gratia gratis data, grace which is to be freely given. And so it was this recognition that God's grace that comes to us has one of two purposes: either it changes me or it's given to me to help change someone else. On a practical level, it comes out as things such as in the midst of my day when I am struggling with being impatient over something or I want something to happen faster, or I'm stuck in traffic, frustrated with any number of things, I can pray one of those little "arrow prayers" as they say it, those prayers that pierce the heavens and go to the heart of God, and I can simply say, "Lord, help me." And in that moment, God can hear my prayer and grant me the race to be patient in the particular moment, and if I am open to receiving the grace, it can change my heart. And in that particular place, I can become more patient - grace that makes me graced - something that changes my heart. But as we know, there are a number of gifts that are given to us not for me, but for others. Before my ordination to the diaconate, I spend a number of days praying various novenas to different saints and I was praying for certain spiritual gifts that I knew I would need if I was to be able to perform my ministry as a deacon and as a priest in any way, shape or form. I noticed a lot of deficiencies in myself and one of those was in public speaking and in preaching. And so, I prayed for the grace to preach. I don't know if you believe that I have the gift of preaching or not, but I think I do simply on account of the fact that when I was leading community prayer, I knew every single guy, we lived all in the same house, there weren't knew faces or anything else, and all I had to do was simply read out of a book and my hands would be shaking the whole time because I was so nervous. At my first Mass, I forgot the words of the sign of the Cross because my human nature was so freaked out about being in front of people. And so I knew if I was to do anything other than be a mumbling fool in the pulpit, that I would need God's grace. And so I prayed, and I believe it was received. 

But it's not for me. I don't stand up here and preach for myself. I preach to myself quite often, but I don't preach for myself. Rather, I preach that others might be able to hear, that the Gospel might be able to be spread and have some actual transforming power in the midst of our world. It's a grace that comes and is given to me simply, and only, to be given away, that others might be able to receive freely of the gift of God. And that's almsgiving - it's the way in which God gives to us some special gift, He makes us stewards as our second reading refers to today, and He invites us to be generous stewards of our gifts. Every single one of us has received a whole variety of gifts from the Lord our God. They come in different ways. They kind of break out into the three general categories of generosity with our time, generosity with our treasure/finances/world means, and generosity with our talents - the things we are good with essential. So God invites us to make use of these things to whatever extent we are able, to be able to continue to build up the Body of Christ because they are given to us for others, not for ourselves. Again, certainly that doesn't mean that every penny that we take in we have to give away and we just have to trust that someone will pay our light bill and someone else will pay our house note and someone else will pay the car note and insurance - obviously that's not the way it works. But it's not to make the things of this world our God. That's what the Lord speaks of in the Gospel - you can't serve God and mammon; mammon being possessions, things. Rather, we have to trust in the providence of God for us, that our God loves us, He knows what we need, and He will grant it to us. And so He invites us, with the gifts He bestows, to be generous. It's easy for us to say no when asked to be generous with our time. Most of us are pretty busy these days, whether it's things at work, at home, things we are doing with the church, whether it's kids, grandkids or other family obligations that takes us here, there and everywhere and it seems like we don't have a minute to stop, and Father asks us to stay a few minutes after Mass, which I'm going to ask y'all today, to stay a few minutes after Mass. And it's easy for us to go, "I got so many things," and to not give our time. Or to know we have other opportunities to grow in our faith or opportunities to serve someone else, not just in the church but in a larger community, and sometimes we can become stingy with out time, which try to hoard it all to our self, not to be able to give it up. We try to store it up for ourselves - the gift of our time. 

The Lord also bestows upon us many treasures, the things of the world. He gives us many gifts and they can be use for incredibly good things, but sometimes we place our security in the things of the world. I think that if my checking account is big enough, I don't have to worry about anything because I don't have to take care of myself. And as soon as I think I can take care of myself, the Lord usually quickly, and boldly, such is not the case. Remember the man in the Gospel, who having an abundance harvest. He looks out and says, "My barn isn't big enough to hold all this, so I'm going to tear down my barn and build an even bigger one." It doesn't work out for him because he tries to hoard it for himself, take for himself, which was not rightly his. Rather the Lord bestow it upon him, to bestow it in generosity to others. So also our talents, the things that we are good at. A lot of times we think that when we can't do anything for the church because we think we can't read in front of people, we can't do whatever we think we are supposed to be doing to be good Christians. But every single one of us has gifts that can build up the Christian community. If there is something you're good at, I can almost guarantee there is a way the Church can utilize that for the good of the community..To be willing to put ourselves at the service of God and the Church, yes but also in our community. But sometimes we can shrink back and say, you know someone else is better than me in that particular aspect, so I'm not going to do that. But we can tie our talents with our time, and go you know I really could do that, but I just don't have time these days, and then we shrink back. Again, it's not to be able to give wholly even to the detriment of our self, but rather to give generosity when we are able to because it teaches us to trust. 

The temptation often times is to control things for ourselves. We get it from our first parents. Adam and Eve, when Eve looked upon the fruit in the garden, she noticed there was three things about it, and one of them was that it was pleasing to the eyes and it was good. She wanted it for herself, and rather than trusting the Lord God would give her what was good and holy, she took it and she tried to keep it for herself. A similar is what the Lord experienced when we was tempted after his 40 days of fasting in the desert; of how the devil came to Him and took Him up the mountain to show Him all the kingdoms of the world, and he says, "All these things, I can give to you. I can give you the souls that you have come to die for, Jesus. All you have to do is bow down before me." And Jesus has the opportunity to take every soul for Himself right on the spot, and the emphasis is to take it. To be able to take rather than to receive. By being obedient to the Father, He now reigns glorious as the King of all the heavens and the earth, and all those souls that could have rightly been taken, have now been given, and even more. Our Lord God provides for us in the same. To the extent that we desire to take something, we will fall short. The desire that we are generosity in our giving and allow the Lord to provide for us, we will always be surprised because our Lord is never outdone in generosity. If we give one, the Lord gives a hundredfold He says, in this world and in the next. What a gift, to know of the love of our God. 

And so when those fears come into our heart in the course of our days and whatever way the Lord is inviting us in generosity, in so many ways we can do exactly as is said in the Gospel. We worry, we worry about tomorrow, we worry about what our food, our drink clothes, what about this, what about that, what if what if what if .... And we worry ourselves, and there is so much concern, and at the root of it all, is because I'm trying to provide for me rather than to let the Lord provide. And so when those moments of fear, reservation and concern come into or hearts, we don't only listen to the words of the Lord spoken to us the prophet Isaiah today. The Lord God says, "Can a mother forget her infant? Be without tenderness for the child of her womb." As crazy as that would seem to us, as if a mother can simply bare a child and forgot that it every happened, she would bore a child in her womb for nine full months and gave birth with joy. As crazy as that seems, the Lord God continues, "Even should she forget, I will never forgot you." I will never forget you. The Lord God knows your needs, He knows your longings, He knows everything. It's simply an invitation to come and to trust. 

Deus Providebit, God will provide. 

Tuesday, February 21, 2017

Pre-Lent: Prayer - Homily for February 19




In the Holy Scriptures, the Lord God speaks to us, and the words of Jesus tell us that where a man's treasure is there also his heart will be. We know that anyone who has ever fallen in love, maybe someone who has ever born a child, and been able to hold that child - maybe a grandchild in their arms for the first time - the know the great joy the have in the other person. They don't have to consciously think about the other person, they just naturally do. One doesn't forget their child, one doesn't forget their beloved. And through the course of the day, they certainly come to mind in pleasant thoughts, and the desire or longing to be able to see them once again. We could say a similar thing of lesser greatness - simply maybe a new hobby, a new found joy, or a new toy. It brings us joy and a desire to be able to see it, enjoy it once again, take part in it once more when we are separated from it. Indeed those things are good and holy - our activities and treasures of this earth, but the most important about us Christians is that we are not people whose treasure is mainly on earth, but our treasure is in heaven. Our treasure is not just a thing, it's a person, and it's the Lord God Himself. The Lord God who comes to us and desires to be with us. Who loves us so much, He even took on our flesh, so we have a great gift in our God. Where man's treasure is, so also his heart will be. 

As such, following the same analogy, there is this reality of the Lord, as we go through the course of our day, it should be such that shouldn't have to consciously think of God if He surely is our treasure. Rather, He should simply come to mind naturally, organically, through the course of our day and the longing to see Him once more, to be with Him, united with Him in a moment of intimacy. That intimacy is what we call prayer. 

We can speak a thousand things on the topic of prayer. Indeed we can fill this chapel ten times over with the number of books that have been printed on the topic of what is prayer, how to do prayer, methods of prayer, spiritualities and so forth. While we can complicate it in so many ways, prayer is actually very simple, and the ones who describe it most simply and beautifully and most directly are the saints of God in the Church. The saints have described prayer as a simple conversation with the Lord. They have described it also as union with our God. St. John Vianney, one of my favorite quotes he references, "Our time of prayer is an overflow of paradise and a foretaste of heaven." A brief moment where we can be united to our God. Ultimately, it's a meeting place of the Bride and the Bridegroom. The Bride, the Church, each individual member comes to the Bridegroom of God to be united and look forward to the heavenly marriage feast that awaits us. 

All of these simply speak to an intimacy - to be willing to open our hearts to the Lord in His generosity in opening His to us. The fact that we can pray should bring us to our knees immediately because the God of creation, the God who made all things, who gave every blessing that we have, it would be enough just to know that He exists, it would be enough to know things about Him. But He goes even farther by letting Himself be known in a personal relationship. heart speaking to heart in a sense. We don't deserve it by any means, but our Lord gives it, and what a blessing. 

St. Augustine described the relationship with God, this time of prayer as a stretching of our hearts. He said in one of his homilies, "Our hearts are too small. They must be stretched." Can you imagine if God came to us one day and we were carrying a sack. And the Lord God said, "I have something I need to give to you." Immediately we would do everything in our power to make sure we can receive what God desires to give. We would take our sack and empty it of the earthly wears we have, whatever the earthly things we posses, and we would take our sack and stretch it as much as possible so it can receive as much as possible, in hopes of receiving what God desires to give. And what God desires to give is Himself - the infinite God, and so our hearts must be infinitely stretched. We must be a people of prayer, continually having recourse to our God. Certainly in the course of our day, calling to mind our Lord, lifting up what they call "the arrows of holiness," the short, little, pious prayers that we pray that pierce the heavens and pierce the heart of God with love, an arrow of love. We must also be a people who spend time in prayer, daily. To make that an absolute necessity. No one among us can go without food, or drink or air, and even less so can we go without God in prayer. So we must prayer. To be able to have the life of God within us. 

While we can complicate again in so many ways, it ultimately comes down to three central points, three essential aspects of prayer.

The first essential aspect of prayer is faith. We must trust in our God. It can be a temptation sometimes to treat God as if He is a magician or a genie, where we go up and say the right prayer, do the right thing, and ta-dah we get what we want. Thankfully God is not like that because every single one of us would be spoiled brats. And beyond that, sometimes your prayer and my prayer might conflict. I would love the church never to get about 55 degrees, some of y'all would hate that. Whose prayer wins? Good question. Theological debate ensues. It's the reality that our God is a Good Father. He doesn't just give us whatever we want, He gives us what is right, true, good and holy. He is a Father who cares for us. The Lord Jesus says to us, "What father among you when his son asks for a fish, would hand him a snake instead?" No one. And if your earthly father is that good, how much more your heavenly Father. And so, we approach our Lord with trust. We approach God our Father with the recognition that even though sometimes our prayers are not answered as we would like, ti seems that there is silence on the other end, we must trust and have faith that our God hears us, and He walks with us. Most importantly, He loves us and will provide for us. 

The second aspect of a life of prayer is honesty. We must be honest with our Lord in prayer. Every single one of us has that place in our house that we know we can store junk. When you got things laying around the house, and you have someone who calls and asks if they can come over real quick you say yeah give me five minutes. And we take those five minutes, we run around the house like a crazy person, grab everything that's a mess, and we throw it into that closet or room and we shove the door. My house looks great, doesn't it? Just don't go in that room, right there. That room is a tornado. We do it with God to in our prayer. We go to prayer, and as we are going to the chapel, Church or Mass, wherever we are going to encounter our Lord in prayer - We think we have to stuff all that bad stuff, the frustrations on my heart, maybe there is anger, suffering, sadness, depression .. I'm going to put those in that room or closet really quick and I'm going to go to prayer and say, Lord look how great my house is. Everything is nice and orderly. We go kneel in prayer and we place our hands in a very pious little angel pose - "Lord thank you for all the wonderful blessings. Life is so amazing. Thank you. Glory be to the Father and the Son and Holy Spirit ..." While inside in the depth of our hearts in that trashy room, we are screaming for God. Screaming. We must be honest in prayer. Because if we go before God in prayer and we give Him what we think He wants, what we think He wants, we are not praying We are lying. The Lord God put the things in our hearts there for a purpose. If there is sadness in our heart, it's for a reason. It's because our heart longs for something or it needs something, God desires to give it to us, He desires to respond. If there is suffering in our heart, anger, frustration, confusion, joy, exhilaration - all of these things - everything of the human heart, God put it there and He wants us to talk to Him about it. Whatever the emotion of the heart - if you are angry, be angry with God. There is some things I've brought to the chapel and made sure no one was around and I spoke to God, and I'm pretty sure if anybody was there they would've blushed because that's where my heart was that day. We need honesty in our prayer with the Lord because if we are honest with God, it gives Him the opportunity to actually deal with the mess of our life, rather than trying to make it appear very nice. 

The third piece is persistence. And this is the hardest part because it's easy for us to go and to trust initially, it's easy for us to go and to be honest with our Lord, but sometimes when things don't go as we desire or as we expect, as we think it should be, as prayer is supposed to be - it's easy for us to give up. We go, in the middle of our prayer, if God doesn't respond like we want, or if ti's quiet on the other end, we just stop. And so often we stop right on the threshold of when God is about to move. We are just about there where God wants to do something and can do something, and we shut the door. We must persist in prayer, day in and day out, every single day, without fail. It should become so much a part of our routine that if we don't have time for prayer, we should be hungry for it. None of us goes through the course of a whole day without eating or without realizing at some point that we are hungry. At some point, your stomach gurgles a bit to let you know that it needs something. It should be the same with our souls. To know that through the course of our day that if we don't spend time with our Lord, something in us should ache a bit to remind us to go to Him.

We have faith, honesty and perseverance. In the midst of all these things, we can do so many things in prayer. Again, tens of thousands of books we can have recourse to. But the most important thing, in the end, if we are struggling, we don't know what to do, if we don't know what to say, tell that to the Lord. When the disciples were struggling with their own prayer, they looked around and seeing the the disciples of John the Baptist, "Lord, John's teaching his disciples to pray. Teach us. What do we do? What do we say? How do we respond?" And He gave them a simple prayer: the Our Father. Not that we simply prayer the Our Father and be done with it, that's all we need to do. He gives us a model, a method of trust imploring each of these things to come before our Lord. Ultimately, if all else fails, if we have no idea of where we are going and what we are doing, there is one simply prayer you need to pray and then rest with the Lord. And that prayer is simply, "Lord, teach me how to pray."